Raudsepp-Hearne, C. et al. (2010): Untangling the Environmentalist's Paradox: Why Is Human Well-being Increasing as Ecosystem Services Degrade? BioScience 60(8): 576-589.

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Reference: 
Raudsepp-Hearne, C. et al. (2010): Untangling the Environmentalist's Paradox: Why Is Human Well-being Increasing as Ecosystem Services Degrade? BioScience 60(8): 576-589.
Short reference: 
Raudsepp-Hearne et al. (2010)
First author: 
Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara
Abstract: 

Untangling the Environmentalist's Paradox: Why Is Human Well-being Increasing as Ecosystem Services Degrade?
Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne, Garry D. Peterson, Maria Tengö, Elena M. Bennett, Tim Holland, Karina Benessaiah, Graham K. MacDonald, and Laura Pfeifer

Abstract:
Environmentalists have argued that ecological degradation will lead to declines in the well-being dependent on ecosystem services. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment paradoxically found that human well-being has increased despite large global declines in most ecosystem services. We assess four explanations of these divergent trends: (1) We have measured well-being incorrectly; (2) well-being is dependent on food services, which are increasing, and not on other services that are declining; (3) technology has decoupled well-being from nature; (4) time lags may lead to future declines in well-being. Our findings discount the first hypothesis, but elements of the remaining three appear plausible. Although ecologists have convincingly documented ecological decline, science does not adeyuately understand the implications of this decline for human well-being. Untangling how human well-being has increased as ecosystem conditions decline is critical to guiding future management of ecosystem services; we purpose four research areas to help achieve this goal.

Notes: 

Untangling the Environmentalist's Paradox: Why Is Human Well-being Increasing as Ecosystem Services Degrade?
Ciara Raudsepp-Hearne, Garry D. Peterson, Maria Tengö, Elena M. Bennett, Tim Holland, Karina Benessaiah, Graham K. MacDonald, and Laura Pfeifer

Tartalom:
Alternative explanations of the environmentalist's paradox
Hypothesis 1: Critical dimensions of human well-being are not captured adequately
Hypothesis 2: Food production is more crucial than other ecosystem services for human well-being
Hypothesis 3: Technology and social innovation have decoupled human well-being from ecosystem degradation
Hypothesis 4: There is a time lag between ecosystem service degradation and impacts to human well-being
Integrating human well-being and ecosystem services
Acknowledgements
References cited

ecosystem services, human well-being, time lags, sustainability, adaptation

Címszavazva - VA

Publisher: 
American Institute of Biological Sciences
Journal: 
BioScience
Location: 
ER Archívum (2010/P-012/1, 2010/P-012/2)
Type: 
scientific paper, conference (full) paper